#StayMadAbby You Aren’t Owed Sh*t

Yesterday, before breakfast could fully digest, the internet was LIT with the #StayMadAbby hashtag.  This was in response to Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s commentary about the case of young Abigail who was not admitted into UT.  We’ll get into her case a little more in a moment. Justice Scalia decided that the appropriate thing to do here was to note that black people shouldn’t be going to schools like UT anyway because we need a slower track.  Oh don’t believe me…just watch… According to the Washington Post:

This is his colloquy with Washington lawyer Gregory G. Garre, who was representing the University of Texas, according to the transcript provided by the Supreme Court.
SCALIA: There are — there are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to — to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having slower-track school where they do well. One of — one of the briefs pointed out that — that most of the — most of the black scientists in this country don’t come from schools like the University of Texas.
GARRE: So this Court —
SCALIA: They come from lesser schools where they do not feel that they’re – that they’re being pushed ahead in — in classes that are too — too fast for them.
GARRE: This Court —
SCALIA: I’m just not impressed by the fact that — that the University of Texas may have fewer. Maybe it ought to have fewer. And maybe some — you know, when you take more, the number of blacks, really competent blacks admitted to lesser schools, turns out to be less. And — and I — I don’t think it — it — it stands to reason that it’s a good thing for the University of Texas to admit as many blacks as possible. I just don’t think —

  Oh you definitely didn’t THINK there JUSTICE!!! And to think he has this job FOR LIFE!! hmph. tumblr_inline_mi32yiySPN1qz4rgp.gif   Back to the case that started this… Once upon a time in a far off land called Texas, there was this rule that if you did well enough to be ranked in the top 10% of your class, you’d automatically get into college.  It was some magical thing that had been bestowed upon the citizens…let’s call them Texans. Anyway, a young lady named Abigail, was only in the top 12% of her class.  Her SAT scores were not anything to brag about and she didn’t have many extra curricular activities.  She had failed the trifecta of college admissions and missed the mark of the magical admissions standard. However, Abigail soon found that there were 47 students who got into the school who had the same grades or worse than she had.  5 of those students were black.  42 were white.  Therefore (because obviously critical thinking and forethought were not things Abigail had grasped), she declared that Affirmative Action, which let in the black students magically, was the reason why she wasn’t admitted. The case has nae nae’d it’s way to the Supreme Court…WTF tumblr_nrugvnwUEY1srua3po4_250.gif Abigail is the epitome of doing the least and wanting the most.  She  feels like black people stole her seat.  Nah baby…your mediocrity handled that for you.  You could have worked harder but NOOOOO.  UT even said you could come on thru if you went to another school and got a 3.2…a THREE POINT TWO.  They didn’t even try to snatch your edges and request a 4.0 for your freshman year. And twitter was not here for the foolery.  The Abby Clapback was real.  Black Twitter showed out in rare form expressing how accomplished we were as well as some witty banter. https://twitter.com/i_love_erica/status/674983706247892993?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw   https://twitter.com/ThatsWhatDeSaid/status/674712661439864834   https://twitter.com/LillianorPaige/status/675014883075723268 And of course I had to throw in my own personal breed of shade: https://twitter.com/whithappens6/status/674993921022402560   https://twitter.com/whithappens6/status/674986055330889728   https://twitter.com/whithappens6/status/674989594677506049 What did you think of Justice Scalia’s Commentary and what you got to say to Abby so she can #StayMad?

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